King Quang Trung’s Temple in Nghe An

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King Quang Trung’s Temple
King Quang Trung’s Temple

Nghe An is famous for its many historical relics and splendid landscapes, including Cua Lo Beach, Kim Lien relic, An Duong Vuong Temple and Pu Mat National Park. However, anyone who goes to this historical land should surely stop at King Quang Trung’s Temple, which was inaugurated in Dung Quyet Mountain last year to honor the national hero.

Dung Quyet Mountain, on the edge of Vinh City in the central province of Nghe An, is used as a peaceful retreat from the bustling city and is also regarded as home to four supernatural creatures; the dragon, unicorn, tortoise and phoenix. Visitors have to climb 400 steps to the top.

King Quang Trung’s Temple
King Quang Trung’s Temple

Majestic and ancient, large and spacey, the temple is striking amidst the endless line pine trees and immense Lam River meandering in the mist.

From the top of Vinh City, idyllically stretching from the mountains to the plains, can be contemplated, with its verdant pine trees, farmland, rivers, high buildings rising from the river banks, and the bustle of life on its pathways and in the coffee shops, restaurants, historical temples, and entertainment areas.

The temple was built in royal architecture including a forecourt, which is the core of the temple, central palace and harem made from lim wood. The pillars are carved with patterns from the Nguyen Dynasty and the roof is made with two lays of bamboo flat-tile, while walls and floors are made of brick and stone.

King Quang Trung’s Temple
King Quang Trung’s Temple

The work was built in 2003, featuring character and spiritual culture of Nguyen Dynasty. The temple also features the Tay Son Museum, Nghe An Museum of ethic works, ethnic culinary area, bird yard, folk games area and traditional craft villages.

Local authorities and residents host an annual ceremony at the temple in December to honor and commemorate the heroes in the victory against Quing invaders.